07
Sep
10

#250 the hedge is on fire!

250/365 the hedge is on fire!, originally uploaded by rosipaw.

I’m soaking in the autumn colours every day – can’t get enough of them. Today I cycled past this flaming hedge, and couldn’t resist taking a picture – even though it’s very similar to yesterday’s one. We even have a separate word in Finnish for the bright autumn colours in nature – ‘ruska’, a loan from Sami, the language of the Finnish indigineous people up in the north. It’s in Lapland, the northernmost area of Finland, that ‘ruska’ is said to be the most spectacular. I should go and see it for myself one day.

We talked about memorization in class today, and what role repetition plays in learning. Based on some research, and our own experiences, we came to the conclusion that repetition does help when learning new vocabulary in a foreign language, for example. So why not repeat these beautiful colours a little, to remember them better when the colourless winter arrives!

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3 Responses to “#250 the hedge is on fire!”


  1. 1 Susan van Gelder
    September 11, 2010 at 20:52

    Repetition helps, but so does using the word in new contexts. That’s what you have done – brought the brilliant colours into a new context for another breath-taking photo.

  2. 2 sinikka
    September 13, 2010 at 22:58

    Thank you, Susan! You are so right about the new context. Students often delude themselves with parrot like repetition.


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